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"I sense a deep humanity in Dvorák's music. He was a great master of orchestration, and he composed unusually beautiful melodies and harmonies. But at the forefront he always presents honesty and generosity. And when we listen to this music, this penetrates deep into our hearts. I consider Dvorák's Violin Concerto to be unique, and it occupies a very special place among all of the violin concertos of this period. Behind it's creation lies a very unusual story. The composition dates back to 1879, but it's premiere did not take place until 1883, exactly four years later. The reason for this was that the concerto was dedicated to Joseph Joachim, who repeatedly requested a number of changes in the piece. The story subsequently ended in such a way that Joachim, despite the changes and his years of collaboration with Dvorák, ignored the piece when it was completed, leaving it to be premiered instead by Czech violinist Frantisek Ondrícek." -Mikhail Pochekin
"I sense a deep humanity in Dvorák's music. He was a great master of orchestration, and he composed unusually beautiful melodies and harmonies. But at the forefront he always presents honesty and generosity. And when we listen to this music, this penetrates deep into our hearts. I consider Dvorák's Violin Concerto to be unique, and it occupies a very special place among all of the violin concertos of this period. Behind it's creation lies a very unusual story. The composition dates back to 1879, but it's premiere did not take place until 1883, exactly four years later. The reason for this was that the concerto was dedicated to Joseph Joachim, who repeatedly requested a number of changes in the piece. The story subsequently ended in such a way that Joachim, despite the changes and his years of collaboration with Dvorák, ignored the piece when it was completed, leaving it to be premiered instead by Czech violinist Frantisek Ondrícek." -Mikhail Pochekin
881488230574
Complete Works For Violin & Orchestra
Artist: Dvorak / Pochekin / Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
Format: CD
New: Available $20.99
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. I. Allegro Ma Non Troppo [11:07]
2. II. Adagio Ma Non Troppo [10:12]
3. III. Finale: Allegro Giocoso, Ma Non Troppo [10:49]
4. Romance in F minor, Op. 11, B. 39 [06:40]
5. Mazurek, Op. 49, B. 90 [11:11]

More Info:

"I sense a deep humanity in Dvorák's music. He was a great master of orchestration, and he composed unusually beautiful melodies and harmonies. But at the forefront he always presents honesty and generosity. And when we listen to this music, this penetrates deep into our hearts. I consider Dvorák's Violin Concerto to be unique, and it occupies a very special place among all of the violin concertos of this period. Behind it's creation lies a very unusual story. The composition dates back to 1879, but it's premiere did not take place until 1883, exactly four years later. The reason for this was that the concerto was dedicated to Joseph Joachim, who repeatedly requested a number of changes in the piece. The story subsequently ended in such a way that Joachim, despite the changes and his years of collaboration with Dvorák, ignored the piece when it was completed, leaving it to be premiered instead by Czech violinist Frantisek Ondrícek." -Mikhail Pochekin
        
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